Editorial Support

Millions of single-use plastic bags are discarded every day, and they find their way into our oceans and natural spaces, polluting our lands and choking wildlife.

This November, don’t fall for big plastic’s misleading campaign: vote YES on 67 to protect our statewide ban on plastic bags (and vote NO on 65, a “deceptive trick” design to confuse voters).

For a full list of editorial endorsements, click here.

Yes on 67

The plastic bag industry’s arguments against a statewide plastic ban are weak, starting with the incredible claim… that single use-bags are actually good for the environmentThey are not.

Read more here.

No on 65

To make it a reality, vote “yes” on Prop. 67 and “no” on Prop. 65. It’s time to tell plastic bag makers that they can no longer profit from polluting the Golden State.

Yes on 67

Voters shouldn’t be fooled by what’s at stake. In a world doused with everlasting plastic, grocery store bags play a harmful role, winding up on beaches, parks and trees, choking fish and wildlife and even clogging recycling machines. Cutting down usage, especially when cloth or paper bags can be swapped in, makes sense.

Read more here.

No on 65

The second measure, Prop. 65, proposes to redirect any proceeds from sales of paper bags that customers buy as a substitute for plastic sacks. Bag makers argue that supermarkets are profiting unfairly from selling paper bags. But the statewide grocers association says the dime-per-bag charge covers their costs, with little left over. The measure plays on phony fears to discredit the overall plastic ban. Major environmental groups are shunning Prop. 65.

Yes on 67

Few forms of trash are more pernicious than those disposable plastic bags that clog storm drains, choke sea life, and litter landfills, parks and beaches. Californians have been trying to get rid of them for nearly a decade.

Read more here.

No on 65

Vote “no” on Proposition 65 and “yes” on Proposition 67. Got it? “No” on the first plastic bag measure, then “yes” on the second one.

Yes on 67

This summer San Diego became the 150th municipality in the state to ban plastic checkout bags, and these days a statewide ban seems as inevitable as it could be effective. In 2012 after San Jose adopted its ban, surveys found an 89 percent reduction in bag litter in its storm drain system and about a 60 percent reduction in city creeks, rivers, streets and neighborhoods. It’s time for California to follow.

Read more here.

No on 65

The plastic bag industry is also financing Proposition 65 over environmentalists objections. Don’t be confused by that measure. Just reject it.

Yes on 67

Vote yes on Proposition 67 to uphold the statewide ban similar to those that already cover 149 cities and counties, where they dramatically reduce plastic bag pollution and its resulting public costs.

Read more here.

No on 65

And vote no on Proposition 65, one of the most disingenuous ballot measures in state history — and that’s saying something. The proposition requires that the money shoppers pay for paper bags in stores go into an environmental fund — but major environmental groups actively oppose it. They know that letting stores keep paper bag proceeds when customers forget their reusable bags is fair compensation for their role in enforcing the ban. The “environmental fund” is a scam to turn the stores against the bag ban, but they continue to support it.

Yes on 67

A yes vote on Prop. 67 upholds the state law banning plastic bags. So, vote yes on 67.

Read more here.

No on 65

Prop. 65 is a distraction by the awful plastic-bag industry. Vote no.

Yes on 67

Plastic bag makers cried foul, and spent more than $3 million to put a referendum on the ballot, exercising a provision in the state constitution that allows a popular vote on a new law before in becomes effective. That referendum is Proposition 67.

Read more here.

No on 65

As a backup, however, they also spent heavily to put Proposition 65 before voters. It would redirect the grocers’ money into a new environmental fund that bag makers say would be more transparent. But without that money, the state ban would be expensive for grocers to implement in parts of the state still not covered by local measures. That’s why a “no” on 65 is important: If both measures pass and Proposition 65 gets more votes, it could supersede the existing law.

Yes on 67

The plastics industry will argue that rather than ban plastic bags, they should be recycled instead. We tried that. Despite the state’s green reputation, Californians recycled only 3 percent of them, meaning an estimated 15 billion were sent to landfills, or worse, scattered throughout our highways, streams, beaches and neighborhoods. Taxpayers spend an estimated $400 million trying to prevent litter from polluting our waterways, and plastic bags are one of the worst culprits.

Read more here.

No on 65

Proposition 65 deserves consideration as one the most disingenuous ballot measures in state history. It’s crucial that California voters understand that key environmental groups oppose Proposition 65, even though it could supply millions of dollars for some of their pet causes. That’s how bad it is. 

Yes on 67

The statewide ban signed by Brown needs to be ratified by the voters in the form of Prop. 67, and we strongly urge you to do so. Truly, it’s the least we can do.

Read more here.

No on 65

Prop. 65 is a thinly disguised effort by the plastic bag industry to exact revenge on the grocery lobby for supporting the plastic bag ban in the first place.

Yes on 67

Bag manufacturers and an industry trade group pumped millions of dollars into placing two measures on the Nov. 8 ballot, both intended to bury California’s law. Don’t let them get away with it. Proposition 67 is a referendum targeting the bag law. Voting yes would uphold the state law, allowing it to finally take effect.

Read more here.

No on 65

Proposition 65 would require grocers to relinquish revenue from the 10-cent fee on reusable plastic or paper bags available to shoppers who don’t bring their own bags. This initiative was a cynical attempt to turn grocers against the bag ban. It didn’t work. Grocers still support the ban, and voters should reject Proposition 65.